School of Public Health and Community Medicine

Injury Epidemiology, Prevention and Control (PHCM9792)

Description

Injury prevention and control is a key public health priority. The study of injury epidemiology, prevention and control is vital to understanding causes of injury and strategies for prevention, to reduce the global burden of injuries and improve access to high quality care. This course is designed for those working in public health or related disciplines who have an interest in injury epidemiology, prevention and control, and would like to broaden their knowledge and skills. This course will develop student's capacities to apply appropriate concepts, frameworks and methods to quantify the epidemiological burden of injury (unintentional and intentional), identify risk factors including the social determinants of health and evidence-based strategies for prevention and management of injury across a range of contexts, cultures and injury types. The course will enable students to focus on an area of interest be it injury type or country context. It will provide students with appropriate theoretical frameworks and methodologies to identify evidence-based, effective strategies for both prevention and control of injury, including opportunities for advocacy. Students will develop methodological skills in conduct of real-world research on injury, including observational studies, evaluation of interventions geared towards prevention, and quantifying the economic impact of prevention. Issues relevant to injury including context, resources, community acceptance, cultural considerations, scalability and sustainability and their impact on injury prevention and control will be considered. Throughout, the course will seek to span these conceptual and methodological areas drawing upon examples and cases from domestic and global contexts, spanning high, middle and low resource settings across a range of injury types to ensure students have a diverse understanding of the issues and are equipped for both research and practitioner roles into the future.

The course draws on internationally recognised experts with a breadth of experience, and has an emphasis on practical learning experiences using real case scenarios. It is important that students enrolling in the course have knowledge and experience in public health or a health-related area. Interested students, who are not enrolled in a Masters program offered by the School of Public Health and Community Medicine will need to contact the course convenor, who will assess whether they have the appropriate background, before enrolling in PHCM9792 Injury Epidemiology, Prevention and Control.

Credit points

This course is an elective course of the Master of Public Health (MPH) and Master of International Public Health (MIPH) programs, comprising 6 units of credit towards the total required for completion of the study program.

Mode of study

External (Distance) and Internal (Fae-to-Face) classes on campus.

Course aim

This course aims to develop student's capacities to apply appropriate concepts, frameworks and methods to quantify the epidemiological burden of injury (unintentional and intentional), identify risk factors including the social determinants of health and evidence-based strategies for prevention and management of injury across a range of contexts, cultures and injury types.

Course Outcomes

On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss injury prevention as a field of research and practice and its potential impact on population health and health systems
  • Identify important contributors to the burden of injuries and long-term sequelae, including individual and environmental risk factors
  • Explain the challenges in injury surveillance and critically appraise methodological approaches to quantifying the burden of injury and associated risk factors across different injury types and contexts
  • Demonstrate understanding of the principles of injury prevention and apply public health frameworks to prevention strategies
  • Propose and justify interventions to reduce the incidence of injury and evaluate the complex issues associated with implementing injury reduction strategies in community settings
  • Discuss the role of advocacy as an approach to support implementation of injury prevention strategies, policy and legislation
Learning and teaching rationale

Core content is provided through lectures, including guest expert lectures. Learning activities, which include the use of case studies and online student discussions, have been designed to engage students in the learning process, encourage active and self-directed learning and provides opportunities for students to reflect on key issues in injury prevention. The course will enable students to focus on an area of interest be it injury type or country context. It will provide students with appropriate theoretical frameworks and methodologies to identify evidence-based, effective strategies for both prevention and control of injury, including opportunities for advocacy. Students will develop methodological skills in conduct of real-world research on injury, including observational studies, evaluation of interventions geared towards prevention, and quantifying the economic impact of prevention. Issues relevant to injury including context, resources, community acceptance, cultural considerations, scalability and sustainability and their impact on injury prevention and control will be considered. Throughout, the course will seek to span these conceptual and methodological areas drawing upon examples and cases from domestic and global contexts, spanning high, middle and low resource settings across a range of injury types to ensure students have a diverse understanding of the issues and are equipped for both research and practitioner roles into the future.

Assessment

Assessment Task 1 – Individual report: Problem based scenario
Length: 1500 words
Weighting: 30%

Assessment Task 2 Online Discussion Forum Participation
Weighting: 20%

Assessment Task 3 Final individual report: Impact evaluation
Length: 2500 words
Weighting: 50%

Readings and resources

Learning resources for this course consist of the following:

  • Course notes and readings
  • Lectures slides (posted in Moodle)
  • Lecture recordings (available in Moodle)
  • Relevant course resources for each Module; and
  • Materials shared as part of the online learning assessment component.

There are no set text books for this course. Relevant course resources are set out in the course notes at the end of each Module.